4 things you may not realize about patient objections [VIDEO]

March 15, 2013

As part of our Morning Huddle e-newsletter, DPR partnered with notable practice management consultants to provide quick video tips to get your team talking. Cathy Jameson, Ph.D. on how to turn patient objection into treatment acceptance.  

As part of our Morning Huddle e-newsletter, DPR partnered with notable practice management consultants to provide quick video tips to get your team talking.

Cathy Jameson, Ph.D. on how to turn patient objection into treatment acceptance.

 

 

When a patient expresses a concern or presents an objection about anything, for example, additional appointment time and fee, they are not necessarily saying they do not want to proceed. On the contrary, here are some interesting points to consider about objections.

  • You identify objections by asking questions. You must identify objections in order to find a solution for a possible barrier.
     

  • A person would not present an objection if they were not interested.

     

  • A person who presents an objection is seeking further information.

     

  • Objections are the progressive steps toward the close.

 

You may dread objections. You may be afraid of them because you think, “The patient doesn’t want this. They are confronting me. They’ll be mad at me. I’d rather not tell them this.”

The subconscious thoughts may prevent you from addressing the objection. You may find yourself backing up or not being supportive of a procedure that adds scheduling time and financial responsibility.

But, you can turn this into a positive and realize that objection is really a gift. It means that the person is interested in the proposal and they are opening the door for you to give them information that will make it possible for them to proceed. Know that most people have difficulty making decisions. You now have a chance to assist them in making that vital decision to accept treatment.

 

Let’s go over an example.

Mrs. Jones has the need for anterior crowns. In order for the doctor to accomplish excellent aesthetic results, he recommends a new technique that provides the laboratory technician with special representations on the working cast so that gingival contour will be taken into consideration during the preparation of the crown. The doctor believes that the results will be much better and that the patient will be much happier if extra steps are taken.

The patient tells the doctor that she understands and agrees. However, when Mrs. Jones is escorted to the business office, she grows questionable about the additional appointments and financial responsibilities.

The business administrator polity lets Mrs. Jones know that in order to accomplish the best results, the doctor wants to spend extra time with her. She goes on to tell Mrs. Jones that although this procedure requires an additional visit and fee, it will save time and money in the long run and will get her the beautiful results she wants.

Verbal skills, along with a clear understanding of how to handle objections will move you into a new level of treatment acceptance. Don’t be afraid of an objection. Look at an objection as a gift. It’s a gift that says, “Clear my questions so I can proceed.”

Discuss this scenario and others and rehearse some verbal skills together. Make it a great week!