The top 10 dental discoveries of 2015

December 1, 2015

2015 has been a remarkable year in dental advancements, from emerging technology and new products, to scientific discoveries and research breakthroughs.

2015 has been a remarkable year in dental advancements, from emerging technology and new products, to scientific discoveries and research breakthroughs. 

The field of dental research had an especially impressive year, with new developments and discoveries emerging seemingly every day. We compiled a list of the top 10 most innovative,  exciting and game-changing research studies published in 2015, that are paving the way for what is sure to be an exceptional next year of dental advancements. 

Check out all the new discoveries that emerged in 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Study finds nanodiamonds might prevent tooth loss after root canals

People undergoing root canals may have gained a powerful, if tiny new ally. Researchers from the UCLA School of Dentistry have found that using nanodiamonds to fortify a material used in the procedure could significantly improve outcomes for patients.

Read the full study here.

 

 

 

 

 

Is dental anesthesia destroying children's teeth?

When dental problems neccessitating surgery arise, the logical response is to treat the condition. However, recent research has found that numbing children up for dental procedures may be causing damage to the very teeth the dentist is trying to treat.

Read the full study here.

 

 

 

 

 

Scientists develop material to rebuild enamel, decrease tooth sensitivity

A recent report confirms scientists have created a new biocompatible material that my rebuild worn enamel and decrease tooth sensitivity for longer periods of time than current materials on the market.

Read the full study here.

 

 

 

 

 

New study finds potential alternative to antibiotics for treating dental disease

Many dental diseases are caused by the overgrowth of oral bacteria, and are typically treated with antibiotics. However, with the rise in antibiotic resistance, new approaches are needed to address and treat dental disease. Researchers in Shanghai may have found a solution.

Read the full study here.

 

 

 

 

Study finds oral bacteria transmission from parent to child increases dental health risks

A new study is calling on dental teams to alert parents to the oral health risk of sharing spoons with toddlers at mealtimes, due to the potential transmission of oral bacteria from mother to child.

Read the full study here.

 

 

 

 

Study finds protein can inhibit bone loss from periodontitis

A new study led by University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine researches demonstrated that a protein can inhibit bone loss associated with periodontitis, and curb the activity of osteoclasts.

Read the full study here.

 

 

 

 

Study finds sleeping in dentures can pose major health hazards

A recent study published by researchers in Japan found that elderly patients who wear dentures while they sleep have a higher risk of developing pneumonia than those who remove them.

Read the full study here.

 

 

 

 

Can xylitol reduce the risk of caries in patients with orthodontic appliances?

Anyone who's had a fixed orthodontic applicance knows how frustrating oral hygiene can become. Fixed appliances often make the perfect breeding ground for bacteria and plaque, which can accumulate under the appliance. In an attempt to abort development of plaque-causing bacteria, researchers recently examined if daily doses of xylitol could make a difference.

Read the full study here. 

 

 

 

 

 

New study can prevent dental implant infections

Dental implants often need to be replaced due to issues such as tissue infections caused by bacteria. In the future, researchers day, these infections can be prevented thanks to a new plasma implant coating that kills pathogens using silver ions.

Read the full study here.

 

 

 

 

Dental care linked to risk of respiratory infections in ICU patients

New research shows vulnerable patients in the ICU who recieved enhanced oral care from a dentist were at significantly less risk for developing a lower respiratory tract infection during their stay in the hospital.

Read the full study here.