How to get the most out of your intraoral camera [VIDEO]

May 6, 2014
Issue 4

Penny Reed of Penny Reed and Associates on how to use your intraoral camera for increased case acceptance and fewer broken appointments.

Penny Reed of Penny Reed and Associates on how to use your intraoral camera for increased case acceptance and fewer broken appointments.

As part of our Morning Huddle e-newsletter, DPR partnered with notable practice management consultants to provide quick video tips to get your team talking.

The intraoral camera is the most underused case presentation tool in a dental practice. Here’s how to get the most out of your intraoral camera, and that means improving case acceptance in your practice and reducing broken appointments.

Morning Huddle | Are you getting the most out of your intraoral camera?

 

 

Using an intraoral camera encourages patient involvement.

  • The camera allows patients to be involved in their diagnosis. Telling the patient what is going on is a one-.way conversation. Using the camera allows the patient to participate, and OWN the problem

Use your intraoral camera as much as possible, including:

  • With each new patient

  • On emergency patients if applicable

  • On recall patients with outstanding treatment or any new issues

  • To show calculus or other oral hygiene issues

  • If you don’t have an intraoral camera, put it in the budget and purchase one ASAP.

Images from an intraoral camera also can be great take-homes for the patient. Here’s how:

  • If a patient doesn’t stay for treatment or isn’t completing treatment today, print the intraoral photos (in color on nice paper, doesn’t have to be photo paper) and send tooth chart.

  • This gives them something to refer to as they make decisions about treatment options. The treatment plan makes no sense to most patients except to remind them how expensive the work will be

  • It also allows spouse/parent/close friend to buy-in, because the patient has something they can show them.

  • Patients will rarely throw away photos or their tooth chart.

  • If appointments are already scheduled, patients are more likely to keep those appointments and go through with the proposed treatment because they see the issue and know the value of getting it corrected