ADA releases Action for Dental Health Year Two: A Progress Report

June 4, 2015

Issue 6

The American Dental Association (ADA) released Action for Dental Health Year Two: A Progress Report, which outlines the initiatives, goals and progress to date of the association's nationwide, community-based movement to improve the nation's oral health, especially for people who lack adequate access to regular dental care.

The American Dental Association (ADA) released Action for Dental Health Year Two: A Progress Report, which outlines the initiatives, goals and progress to date of the association's nationwide, community-based movement to improve the nation's oral health, especially for people who lack adequate access to regular dental care.

The report highlights the achievements of dentists and community partners who have developed models of care that fit their communities' unique needs.

"It is our hope that the momentum we've achieved this year will continue to grow in years to come, until all Americans can enjoy the good dental health they deserve,"  ADA President Dr. Maxine Feinberg said.

To learn more about Action for Dental Health, watch the video below:

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Action for Dental Health has taken root in every state in the nation and continues to grow as ADA member dentists work to provide care now to people already suffering from untreated dental disease, strengthen and expand the public/private safety net and bring dental health education and disease prevention into communities. Action for Dental Health comprises eight initiatives, each with individual goals aimed at improving America's dental delivery system.

The initiatives include:

  • Getting people the right care in the right setting with referral programs from hospital emergency rooms to dentists.

  • Providing long-term care to nursing home residents who are disproportionately affected by lack of dental care.

  • Creating community-based contracting between local dentists,  federally qualified health centers and other public and private clinics that provide care to the underserved.

  • Expanding community water fluoridation to help prevent tooth decay.

  • Utilizing community dental health coordinators to help underserved people connect with community resources and dentists who can provide care.

 

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