3 Steps to more effective case presentation [VIDEO]

March 1, 2013

As part of our Morning Huddle e-newsletter, DPR partnered with notable practice management consultants to provide quick video tips to get your team talking. Cathy Jameson, Ph.D. on how to set the stage for the best reception and response to treatment plans you present.

As part of our Morning Huddle e-newsletter, DPR partnered with notable practice management consultants to provide quick video tips to get your team talking.

Cathy Jameson, Ph.D. on how to set the stage for the best reception and response to treatment plans you present.

 

 

The case presentation is the fulcrum of your practice. It really doesn’t matter how well you perform the dentistry itself, make a financial arrangement, schedule an appointment or anything else, if a person doesn’t first decide that they want the dentistry. People buy what they want long before they buy what they need. So, there’s your ultimate challenge - helping people want what you believe they need. How you present your recommendations makes all the difference.

There are three steps to creating a successful case presentation: Plan. Prepare. Present.

 

> PLAN

The planning process is an essential step. Spend time planning an individual’s case, study your diagnostic data, determine the plan of action that would benefit the patient optimally and organize your presentation. Invest your time and attention in the planning of a case prior to the presentation to the patient. Consider scheduling time into your week for the planning of your cases. This may be some of the most valuable time you spend each week. 

> PREPARE

Once you have gathered and studied a patient’s appropriate clinical and personal data, it is time to prepare for your presentation. Carefully plan the case: what you want to do to accomplish optimum health or appearance, where you want to start, how you will proceed on sequential appointments. Use a treatment plan sheet that allows you to carefully and specifically outline this optimum treatment plan. Then practice your presentation, making sure to use patient-friendly language.

> PRESENT

The attention span of an adult in a presentation situation is about 17 minutes. You don’t have much time to get the person’s attention, make your presentation, identify and overcome objections and close. You can stay in control of the situation by asking questions and listening; being aware of your body language; and using visual aids.

For "Communicating and Listening with Body Language," by Cathy Jameson, Ph.D., click here!

The foundation of your practice is your case presentation. Everything in your practice springboards from this critical system. Focus on your case presentation skills and make a commitment to continually improve those skills. Learn to ask questions and listen.

There is more dentistry sitting in your charts waiting to be done than you could probably ever do in the rest of your career. Get the dentistry out of the charts and into the mouths of your patients by making your case presentation the main focus of your practice as you make this a great week!