What (or who) halts change in your practice? Fix it! [VIDEO]

January 31, 2013

As part of our Morning Huddle e-newsletter, DPR partnered with notable practice management consultants to provide quick video tips to get your team talking. Here, Cathy Jameson, Ph.D. of Jameson Consulting offers 3 pieces of advice on how to lead lasting change in your dental practice.

As part of our Morning Huddle e-newsletter, DPR partnered with notable practice management consultants to provide quick video tips to get your team talking.

Here, Cathy Jameson, Ph.D. of Jameson Consulting offers 3 pieces of advice on how to lead lasting change in your dental practice.

Change is an inevitable part of a growing, progressive dental practice, but change is not always easy. So, it’s also not always greeted with open arms. That is when motivation and communication come into play. Even if you’re not embarking on a major change, but you’re just trying to keep a dental dream team inspired to excellence, motivation and communication skills are crucial to contentment in your practice.

Here are a few recommendations developed from research and top clinicians on the magic of motivation.

Become a Change Agent

As the leader of your organization, you are interested in the continuous improvement of your practice. You have the responsibility of leading your team to accomplish improvement goals. Therefore, you are a change agent, a helper so to speak, for people involved with the change associated with growth and development.

Motivation and Communication

One of the greatest challenges in today’s practice is communicating effectively so that motivation is an end result of working together. Are motivation and communication connected? Does the way one communicates impact employee motivation? Of course it does. Motivation’s primary function is the inner drive or need that leads to sustained effort toward a specific goal. The two go hand in hand and will lead your practice in the right direction.

Overcoming Resistance to Change

Trying to motivate your team to change may generate frustration. Most people who are change agents realize that they can better assist other people toward effective, independent functioning only by helping people to help themselves.

Independent functioning comes in when team members are motivated to change, implement the change and maintain their new ways without dropping back to the old ways. In order for this type of motivation to occur, you must create an environment conducive to change, create established goals, provide clear instructions to the new system or change and motivate your team.

Visit the Jameson Community for an exclusive article from Cathy Jameson on Attitude.

Motivation is the most critical factor in productivity. If everyone is on the same page and if the doctor and key team members can continue to motivate and encourage others, then the sky is the limit. The key is to keep everyone goal-oriented, unified and excited about the possibilities.  


Look around the room right now. Is it time to explore some changes? Are you motivated to discover some new options? Make a list of possible positive changes you can explore soon - and make this a great week.

 

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Cathy Jameson, Ph.D.

Jameson Consulting 3 pieces of advice on how to lead lasting change in your dental practice.