The DMD Check-Up: Dentists Wanted—In China

Here's our weekly look at the top dentistry-related news from around the web.

China is proving to be a good destination for dentists looking for a new base of operations. That story tops this week’s DMD Check-Up. Also making the list, a new study shows a potential link between brushing teeth and reducing the risk of a heart attack.

Dentists Wanted: In China (PR Web)

Looking for change—big time? “China’s rapidly expanding middle class is creating a demand for dentists that is far greater than local dentists can keep up with. It is now easier than ever for US dentists to visit China for short periods throughout the year and provide services to local patients,” says the International Academy of Contemporary Dentistry.

How Teeth Brushing Might Prevent Heart Attacks (The Telegraph)

“Brushing teeth thoroughly to remove plaque could help prevent heart attacks and strokes by reducing inflammation in the body to levels close to what can be achieved by statins,” a new study from the Florida Atlantic University suggests.

• Irwin Smigel, New York Dentist Behind Cosmetic Techniques, Dies (New York Times)

Dr. Irwin Smigel, a pioneer of aesthetic dentistry who brightened the smiles of celebrities like Elizabeth Taylor, Tony Bennett, Jimmy Fallon and Bruce Willis, died this week in Manhattan at age 92. “The eyes may be the soul of the face, but the mouth is the first thing people look at,” said Dr. Smigel.

America’s Favorite Cities (Travel + Leisure)

Are you a dentist who is seriously considering a personal or professional relocation? “In the annual survey, readers of all stripes evaluate hundreds of cities and towns across a range of categories, from the friendliness of the locals to the quality of the pizza. #1: Buffalo, NY.

Is Dental Insurance Worth the Cost? (CBS News)

A thorough story by a major news organization on the ins and outs of dental insurance. Dentists should review to see how better practices might improve their bottom line. Fact: “about 64% of Americans have dental insurance. Nearly all of them have coverage through work or a group plan like AARP, Medicaid, Tricare (for military families) and the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program.”

Real Doctors Easily Surpass Online Diagnosis (Forbes)

In the first direct comparison between human-made and computer-based diagnoses, done at Harvard Medical School, the performance of physicians was vastly superior. Researchers found that doctors made a correct diagnosis more than twice as often as 23 commonly used symptom-checker apps.

A Look at the Clinton and Trump Health Reform Proposals (Commonwealth Fund)

One will be America’s new president come November 8, and Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have two distinct approaches to health reform. This independent analysis “estimates how the candidates’ proposals would affect health insurance coverage, the federal deficit, and consumers’ out-of-pocket health care spending.”

Is Beating Bad Breath the Key to Happiness? (Dentistry.co.uk)

More cause to encourage people to have a good oral health routine: “a new study in the International Journal of Dental Hygiene looked at the impact of bad breath in relation to people’s quality of life and found that, on average, people who suffered from bad breath were found to be twice as unhappy as those who didn’t.”

Some Truths Behind Multicultural Americans' Smiles (Mtn. Grove News-Journal)

In recognition of National Dental Hygiene Month, Colgate is out with some facts regarding “the myths and misinformation among multicultural communities in America about optimal oral care habits.” One myth: “Nearly one third of Americans believe you can get rid of cavities by brushing.”

US Dental Decay: Seniors Worse Off Than Children (Fox 2 Detroit)

America’s senior citizens may actually have higher rates of new tooth decay than children, according to the Center for Disease Control. “This is mostly in part due to the lack of care available to them—more than 25% of seniors haven't seen a dentist in 5 years,” according to this news report from Michigan.