The Best and Worst Places to Have a Baby

August 16, 2017
DMD Staff

After graduating dental school, finding a job, and getting financially established, you may be considering starting a family of your own. And while you probably expect to shell out some serious cash to raise a child, where you start your family can make a world of difference. Continue below for the key findings of WalletHub’s latest research on the best and worst states to have a baby.

The U.S maintains the highest birthing costs in the world.

Starting a family is one of the most challenging and exciting undertakings of a person’s life. But no one brings a child into this world thinking a little bundle of joy will make life easier. As priceless and rewarding as parenthood may be, there are opportunity and, of course, financial costs. Big ones.

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WalletHub, a personal finance website, put their data analysts to the test to find out which states are the most and least ideal for child rearing. Using 20 key cost measures, health care accessibility and family-friendliness as criteria, WalletHub’s data range from hospital conventional-delivery charges to child care costs and number of pediatricians per capita.

If you’re determined to have children of your own in the near future, you may want to consider relocating to one of these top ranked states, according to WalletHub’s analysis.

Best States to Have a Baby

1. Vermont

2. Minnesota

3. New Hampshire

4. Connecticut

5. North Dakota

6. Massachusetts

7. Maine

8. Utah

10. Nebraska

Worst States to Have a Baby

1. Mississippi

2. Louisiana

3. Nevada

4. West Virginia

5. Alabama

6. South Carolina

7. Florida

8. Georgia

9. New Mexico

10. Arkansas

Study Highlights

·Maryland, New Hampshire, North Dakota, West Virginia and Utah offer the lowest C-section-delivery costs

·New Jersey has one of the highest costs for both conventional and C-section delivery

·Despite being some of the overall worst places to have a baby, Mississippi, South Carolina, Louisiana and Alabama boast the lowest average annual infant-care costs.

·Washington, D.C., Delaware, Vermont, Massachusetts and Nebraska average the most pediatricians and family doctors per capita

·Washington, D.C., Vermont, Maine, Alaska and Minnesota boast the most OB-GYNs and Midwives per capita.

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