Study shows fluoride solution stimulates jawbone regeneration in dental implant patients

May 6, 2013

Drawing on a study of bio-resorbable synthetic hydroxyapatite granules, the Journal of Oral Implantology reports that cell proliferation increases when the bone-supplement granules are exposed to a 4% sodium fluoride solution.

Drawing on a study of bio-resorbable synthetic hydroxyapatite granules, the Journal of Oral Implantology reports that cell proliferation increases when the bone-supplement granules are exposed to a 4% sodium fluoride solution.

This is good news for potential implant patients with deficient bone mass in the jaw, as a sufficient amount of bone is necessary before a practitioner can perform the procedure. 

Current bone regeneration methods include the use of artificial materials, but the surface coatings of many implants have a negative effect on natural cell proliferation in the jawbone.  On the other hand, after fluoride is applied to an implant surface, it triggers bone-creating cell reproduction and increases the overall amount of bone regeneration.

According to the journal, only fluoride concentrations of 1.0 to 2.0 parts per million displayed this effect; however, when the concentration extended to 5.0 parts per million, the fluoride significantly inhibited cell proliferation.

The official publication of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, the Journal of Oral Implantology is the first and oldest journal specializing exclusively in implant dentistry. For a full text of this study, or for more information about the Journal of Oral Implantology and the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, head to www.joionline.org.