Scientists develop material to rebuild enamel, decrease tooth sensitivity

January 15, 2015

A recent report confirms scientists have created a new biocompatible material that may rebuild worn enamel and decrease tooth sensitivity for longer periods of time than current materials on the market.

A recent report confirms scientists have created a new biocompatible material that may rebuild worn enamel and decrease tooth sensitivity for longer periods of time than current materials on the market.

Loss of enamel not only creates tooth sensitivity but also increases the risk of cavities, pulp inflammation and other dental diseases.

Tooth sensitivity, a common dental problem, often occurs as enamel degrades, exposing small, porous material called dentine. This material contains tiny tubes that expose underlying nerves to heat and cold.

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Chun-Pin Lin, a professor of dentistry at National Taiwan University, and other researchers tested the new biocompatible material, containing calcium and phosphorus, on dogs and found it plugged the tubes more deeply and was more durable than current treatments, such as special toothpastes. They describe the deep plugging as a "biomimetic crystalline dentin barrier."

Studies of the dogs'; teeth determined significant crystal growth and no pulp irritation after 70 days, researchers said, adding the material is promising for human treatment.

The report, "A Mesoporous Silica Biomaterial for Dental Biomimetic Crystallization," appeared in the journal ACS Nano.

Related reading: How dental self-etch adhesives can help prevent sensitivity