Recruitment Begins with a Resume

August 9, 2017
Dr. Anne Marie Gorczyca

Developing a hiring process that produces reliable, high-performing employees can seem complicated. Orthodontist and author Anne Marie Gorczyca has developed a system for finding the diamonds amongst the rough. Continue below to learn about her hiring flow.

A pattern of job changes is a sign that an applicant may not be the best fit for your practice.

Hiring is one of the most important decisions you will make in your dental practice. In your pursuit of building the best team, take the time to get the know the person you may hire by giving recruitment the attention it deserves. The following tips will get you started on developing a hiring process that draws out stellar candidates.

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1. Step one of recruitment begins with a resume. Once your job listing is posted, request resumes via email. This ensures that the candidate is up to date with computer use and able to use technology.

2. Do not include your office address or phone number on your job-opening announcement. Staying anonymous will minimize your practice disruption by eliminating unnecessary walk-ins and phone calls. A separate email address or fax number will keep the process organized.

3. Give every resume a glance. Good resumes will be well organized and show attention to detail. Spelling and accuracy are important.

4. Evaluation of applicant history reveals many things. Good grades demonstrate ability and focus. Great attendance reveals responsibility and commitment. Combine this with a future favorable behavioral interview, and you may have a dental team all-star.

5. Employment history reveals past jobs duration. Work changes in less than one year more than twice could be a warning sign that this candidate may not be committed to their choice of career or that they have a work-integration problem.

6. Home address or year of graduation may not be listed on the resume. You may not legally ask the candidate for their address, graduation year or current age during the hiring process.

7. Candidates may voluntarily list their address on their resume. Close proximity to the office can be a key to long-term success. Individuals who live within a shorter driving distance tend to stay at their place of employment.

8. Look for gaps in employment history. A resume which displays constant job changes could be a sign that this applicant has performance or behavioral issues. Since dentistry is a service industry, previous experience dealing with people and a focus on customer service is always a plus.

9. From all the resumes received, narrow your search to a reasonable number of candidates. Ten is an ample number.

10. Step two of the hiring process is to place an initial phone interview call. Tell each candidate about the job and ask a few questions. Listen to how each person answers. Do you like their voice? Do they speak clearly? Are they polite? Are they enthusiastic and energetic? Score each candidate on a scale of one to 10. Narrow your candidate pool down to the top five from your initial phone interview process.

11. Continue on to Step three of recruitment by checking references and candidate background by asking past employers the all-important question: "Would you rehire this person?" Continue on with “yes” candidates in search of new-hire excellence.

Dr. Gorczyca is the author of the books "It All Starts with Marketing," "Beyond the Morning Huddle," and "At Your Service." Books available on Amazon.

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