ProCare DIY provides DIY computer support for dentists

February 9, 2016

Learn more about this new national initiative in IT security from High Tech Innovations, LLC.

High Tech Innovations, LLC (HTI), a leading provider of IT services and unified communications announced the unveiling of a new national initiative called ProCare DIY.

ProCare DIY is a proactive approach to managed services that assists medical and dental practices in maintaining efficient computers systems, staying HIPAA compliant and combatting malicious internet threats. While the necessity for IT security is in plain sight, many small to mid-sized health care practices ignore this area of their business until it is too late.

HTI’s managed ProCare DIY program reportedly provides proactive resources to “do-it-yourself” practice owners everywhere to help them manage their computer networks and servers on a “do-it-yourself” basis.

In its purest form, HTI’s ProCare DIY services anticipate IT issues before they crop up. It is a proactive and cost-effective approach designed to change the way practices and businesses improve their productivity, streamline their efficiency and keep their critical information safe. This approach is said to enable practice owners to stay focused on their core competencies instead of trying to understand the complexities of maintaining IT networks.

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“Millennial practice owners are just starting to break into health care practices, and we are seeing that they enjoy taking care of their own computers and IT networks," HTI President Jeffrey Weiss said. "However, this is a huge responsibility when it comes to compliance and HIPAA. Data security is not something they have learned about nor should they have to. This is why we came out with ProCare DIY. It is pretty much data security in a box among other things,”

There are five critical areas where ProCare DIY is said to leverage HTI’s proactive approach to enhance security:

1) Anti-virus/anti-malware. Most viruses spread so fast because they are delivered in the simplest ways. Viruses are usually deployed through email, software downloads or phishing sites. ProCare DIY provides virus protection and regularly updates the protection so the latest threats can be combatted.

2) Data backup. If you’ve ever lost your data, your patient records or an X-ray, you’ve felt the sting of a lacking data backup program. While most businesses have partial backups in place, ProCare DIY provides the practice with monitoring services for most of the industry standard software programs on the market.

Related reading: Is your dental practice completely HIPAA compliant?

3) Software updates. If you have ever “snoozed” a security update, you’ve potentially put your practice at risk for greater harm or, worse yet, compliance issues.The ProCare DIY team of technicians work around the clock to instantaneously and continuously update software so practices are always on the latest patches and updates from Microsoft.

4) Proactive server/computer monitoring. If there is one certainty in IT, it is that things are uncertain. Computers crash, software does not work as it should and problems occur. And when they do, the way you respond can be the difference between a minor hiccup and a full-blown business interruption. ProCare DIY will catch issues and report them to you proactively.

5) Secure/compliant remote access. Every computer put on the ProCare program will receive a Logmein account through a secure HTI portal ensuring HIPAA compliancy.

“When a practice takes the time to assess these areas of their business, it’s very easy to dramatically improve the health of their technology,” Weiss said. “We are very well-versed in these areas and can bring years of expertise and experience to the table. The modern healthcare practice can simply not afford to ignore these areas of their business any longer and by taking advantage of ProCare DIY and partnering with HTI we can prevent a catastrophic event.”

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