DenMat's FLASHlite Magna 4.0 minimizes light divergence with proprietary optics

June 6, 2012
Issue 6

Can you explain in detail how the proprietary optics in the FLASHlite Magna 4.0 curing light work? An optical element in the curing light more effectively focuses the light emitted from the LED, maintaining its focus and minimizing divergence. After traveling through the optic, the beams are roughly parallel or collimated. Typically, the light emitted from a curing probe or handpiece extension exhibits divergence that increases with distance. The FLASHlite Magna 4.0 produces a curing beam with significantly less beam spread.

Can you explain in detail how the proprietary optics in the FLASHlite Magna 4.0 curing light work?
An optical element in the curing light more effectively focuses the light emitted from the LED, maintaining its focus and minimizing divergence. After traveling through the optic, the beams are roughly parallel or collimated. Typically, the light emitted from a curing probe or handpiece extension exhibits divergence that increases with distance. The FLASHlite Magna 4.0 produces a curing beam with significantly less beam spread.

Less beam spread means that light intensity (mW/cm2) remains high as distance to the composite resin increases. The distance from the cusp of the tooth to the floor of a Class 2 Preparation can easily be 5 mm or more. The curing light’s beam, and more important the concentration of photons, must deliver enough energy to fully polymerize the resin layer all the way through.

What made DenMat decide to develop a new curing light?
DenMat has a legacy of innovation and recognition for top performing curing lights and dental devices. The FLASHlite Magna 4.0 continues the tradition and reputation started by the Sapphire PAC light of “getting it right.” For dental curing this means: the right wavelengths, the right intensity as distance to the restoration increases, and the right uniform illumination across a large spot area.