ADA Asks Trump to Consider Reforms in 2017

January 23, 2017
Sarah Handzel, BSN, RN

“In too many cases unnecessary federal regulations contribute to the cost of providing care making it more difficult for our members to deliver oral health care services at an affordable price,” the American Dental Association wrote in a letter to the Trump administration.

, the American Dental Association (ADA) has asked that the administration consider several oral healthcare reforms in 2017 that could affect the dental profession nationwide. The letter is a result of the Association’s belief that “in too many cases unnecessary federal regulations contribute to the cost of providing care making it more difficult for our members to deliver oral health care services at an affordable price.”

In the letter, the ADA requested that the administration review several current health care regulations that, they suggest, must be rescinded or amended to lessen the adverse impact and burden on dental professionals and their patients. Several health care regulations were highlighted in the letter, and recommendations for improvement from the ADA were included:

· Ordering and Referring (Medicare) — Dentists that do not participate in Medicare should be exempt from the Medicare Ordering and Referring requirements.

· Medicare Part D — Dentists and other health care professionals who do not participate in Medicare should be excluded from Medicare Part D enrollment requirements.

· Affordable Care Act, Section 1557 — The ADA recommends Section 1557 simply be enforced as is by the Office of Civil Rights without the formal publication of regulations. Section 1557 pertains to nondiscrimination in health care environments. If this regulation is not rescinded, the ADA recommends an exemption for small businesses with less than 25 employees.

· Requirement for providers participating in Medicare Advantage Programs to enroll in Medicare — Recommendations from the ADA include full repeal of this regulation to ensure providers of covered services in Medicare Advantage plans may continue to treat patients who choose to use their services, even if they are out-of-network providers.

· Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration — In response to a proposed expansion of regulations to cover health care practices providing substance abuse disorder diagnoses, treatments, or referrals, the ADA is asking the incoming administration to exempt dental practices from this requirement if a full repeal of this rule is impossible.

The ADA concluded the letter by saying the organization “is looking forward to working with the Trump Administration on a great many issues affecting oral health care in America.”