10 ways you should never describe yourself

June 11, 2012

Issue 6

Great marketing isn't always easy. Whether marketing yourself, your practice or a dental product, there is a fine line between messages and strategies that make you feel good and messages and strategies that make your potential patients and customers say yes to what you're offering.

Great marketing isn't always easy. Whether marketing yourself, your practice or a dental product, there is a fine line between messages and strategies that make you feel good and messages and strategies that make your potential patients and customers say yes to what you're offering.

We could write an entire series of articles on new marketing methods and social media tools, but content fed into those marketing channels is still the crucial core of any approach. When you recognize this, language and the proper use of words and tone is vital.

That's why this article from Inc. should be read in its entirety! For those who need a quick dental-specific recap, there are 10 words that do more harm than good:

"Motivated."

In general, it is best not to tout things that you are supposed to be doing or characteristics that you should have as somehow being extraordinary. For the dental professional, words in this vein could also include "caring" and "patient-focused." If possible, demonstrate these qualities - don't just say it.

"Authority."

Similarly, don't just claim to be an authority - prove it. For example, don't just say that you're an high-tech dentist, list the technology in your practice (such as digital radiography or lasers). Don't just say that you're a leading implant dentist. Share your qualifications and include examples of prior work.

"Global provider."

On a dental scale, this has more to do with not coming off as a small company or practice trying to appear big. Don't be ashamed of who you are.

"Innovative."

Whether you (or your product) are truly innovative, it is a word easily lost in marketing noise. As the author puts it, "Give us something real so your innovation is unspoken but evident..."

"Creative."

This is one of many words that is used so often that it no longer stands out.

"Curator."

This is a buzzword in business circles as people use their social media prowess to claim a certain authority. In the dental space, consider other ways in which you might be misrepresenting yourself or overstating your case.

"Passionate."

Part of the Inc. piece that made our editors laugh out loud! When describing your feelings toward a topic, "try focus, concentration, or specialization instead. Save the passion for your loved one."

"Unique."

Chances are your dental practice probably isn't unique. Don't waste time making the case for being "unique." Patients care more about you being "better." Concentrate your efforts on demonstrating how you deliver the best results.

"Guru."

It is affirming and wonderful when a patient or colleague describes you this way. It just seems kind of pompous when you describe yourself that way.

"Incredibly..."

It is enough to be "dedicated." When you are "incredibly dedicated" it seems like filler.

If there are examples of great dental marketing that you've helped create or would like to share, let us know! Drop a URL in the comments below or send us an e-mail.