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    From 1 to 50, the best and worst states to work in a dental practice

    Using a set of 10 criteria, we look at each state to see how it really stacks up for dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants and dental front office team members.

    For many of us, we’re pretty partial to where we live and work. We think it’s a great place with a lot of great features. Maybe you love that you’re close to the mountains or ocean. Maybe you love the big-city vibe or the small-town feel. Maybe you think this is the best place to raise a family or the best place to be single and free. Maybe, just maybe, it’s the place where you were born and raised and you can’t imagine living anywhere else.

    All of those things are great … but is where you are right now a great place to work in a dental practice? Have you ever thought about that? We did, and we used a set of 10 “measuring sticks” to help us build our inaugural list of the best and worst states to work in a dental practice.

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    The 10 things we looked at to determine are rankings were…

    • Percentage of population who visited the dentist within the past year

    • Median income

    • Population’s confidence in the United States economy

    • Percentage of population worried about money

    • Percentage of population without insurance

    • Population’s overall well being

    • Cost of living

    • Education level of patients

    • Violent crime per 100,000 residents

    • Percentage of population on Medicaid

    We looked at each state using these 10 criteria and gave each state a number from one to 50 depending on their ranking (one being a very good number and 50 being a very bad number). We then compiled the 10 number rankings for each state to give that state a “final score.” We ranked the states from one to 50 based on that final score to give us the best and worst states to work in a dental practice.

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    “What we tried to do with this was to give an overall view of each state,” said Kevin Henry, group editorial director. “We wanted to look at each state from a number of viewpoints and present a true cross-section of some of the good – and not-so-good – things about various states. I have to admit, some of the results were pretty surprising to me … and I think they will be for our readers as well.”

    Read on to see where your state ranked, and why it landed where it did in our national rankings.

     


     

    Navigate by Ranking:

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    Navigate by State:

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