Ivoclar Vivadent's IPS e.max can be the single ceramic your office uses

August 8, 2012
Issue 8

I’ve been using IPS e.max pretty much since it hit the market. I do a lot of single-unit posteriors and full mouth reconstructions, and at the time I was experiencing some failures with zirconia based ceramic layered restorations. I was looking for something that could replace that in my office. 

I’ve been using IPS e.max pretty much since it hit the market. I do a lot of single-unit posteriors and full mouth reconstructions, and at the time I was experiencing some failures with zirconia based ceramic layered restorations. I was looking for something that could replace that in my office. 

Why was IPS e.max the product you were looking for? What are the benefits?

I’ve been a metal free doctor for awhile, and now I am more confident in all-ceramic restorations for single tooth dentistry patients and likewise with my full mouth rehab patients, especially for patients with a lot of wear. IPS e.max has been the savior for those patients. You get the esthetics you have been accustomed to with Empress, you can bond and be conservative with cases with its ability to be very thin while maintaining the strength. In summary, It’s better than any all-ceramic restoration on the market that you can bond with. It’s conservative yet strong, and you can get the layered look with the monolithic strength.

What are the benefits to your patients?

They leave with a restoration that looks like their tooth did before they required that restoration. You don’t have to take away a lot of tooth structure because e.max is thin but strong, so patients have longevity with their great looking restoration.

For dentists who aren’t using IPS e.max yet, why would you encourage them to do so?

I got away from PFM crowns a long time ago. Now I believe there are multiple reasons to use IPS e.max over a porcelain fused to high noble metal. First of all the expense of gold. Single restorations can cost you a lot of money, and when you’re done with that restoration, it’s opaque so it doesn’t have the natural appearance of tooth structure. That isn’t the case with IPS e.max. There’s also a cost benefit to the practice, yet it’s a more esthetic restoration that looks more like natural tooth structure and the adjacent teeth. It has about 106 ingots so the ability to match adjacent tooth structure is there. You also have strength. Its flexural strength is roughly 400 MPa, which is twice as strong as any porcelain fused to metal crown. One of the final benefits is its ease of use. The dentist has the ability to use it as a bonded restoration or use it as a conventionally cemented restoration. There are not a lot of restorations available that give you the ability to do both.

You have strength, you have appearance, you have cost and you have ease of use. I don’t know what can be better than that as far as what people are looking for in single tooth dentistry. These units will cost more for larger cases, but you still have strength predictability and cosmetic predictability. It really can be the single ceramic your office uses.”