dental practice's management goals in mind. The concepts and ideas conveyed through each book can easily translate into your dental practice, among your staff and even your patients.

Linda Steeves is a HygieneFusion consultant, coach and mentor. Steeves works as a clinical hygienist and also assists dental offices and dental hygienists to achieve a higher potential.

"/> dental practice's management goals in mind. The concepts and ideas conveyed through each book can easily translate into your dental practice, among your staff and even your patients.

Linda Steeves is a HygieneFusion consultant, coach and mentor. Steeves works as a clinical hygienist and also assists dental offices and dental hygienists to achieve a higher potential.

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    May Book Review: QUIET: The Power of Introverts In a World That Can't Stop Talking

    How do you react to environmental stimulation? Statistics show that, more often than not, dentists are introverts.

    DPR editors have compiled a list of must-read books with your dental practice's management goals in mind. The concepts and ideas conveyed through each book can easily translate into your dental practice, among your staff and even your patients.

    Linda Steeves is a HygieneFusion consultant, coach and mentor. Steeves works as a clinical hygienist and also assists dental offices and dental hygienists to achieve a higher potential.

    Susan Cain is a former corporate lawyer and negotiations consultant. She's also a self-described introvert. Cain argues that we design our schools, workplaces, and religious institutions for extroverts, and that this bias creates a waste of talent, energy, and happiness.


    Susan Cain's QUIET: The Power of Introverts In a World That Won't Stop Talking lays out a positive framework of introverts and extroverts. The defining factor becomes how each particular group reacts to stimulation and how they “re-charge their battery." Introverts prefer and are drawn to an inner world of thought and re-charge by being alone. They tend to be innovative and creative. This is not to say they cannot place themselves in environments with many people and noise. When introverts have, for whatever reason, been in an environment of the extrovert reality, they need then to spend time alone to once again feel like themselves.

    Oppositely, extroverts prefer action to contemplation. They can spend time in thought, but soon the need the stimulation of people, activity and noise. Extroverts tackle assignments quickly and make fast decisions. These personalities favor quick decisions, even at the risk of being wrong. Working well in teams and socializing in groups are high traits, according to Cain.


    “There's zero correlation between being the best talker and having the best ideas.” -- Susan Cain


    It has been reported that dentistry, specifically dentists, is one of the professions that attract introverts. Keep in mind that it has been also reported that one third to one half of Americans are introverts, meaning every two or three people you know are introverts. The chance that the dentist involved in a particular dental practice is an introvert becomes substantial. Being able to appropriately identify this trait in a dental practice would enhance the emotional balance and ultimately the profitability of the business.

    Past history has shown us that extroverts were applauded and excelled, whereas introverts were left behind. In the late 1940s, Paul Black of the Harvard School of Business suggested that Harvard should reject the “sensitive, neurotic type of the intellectually over stimulated in favor of the boys of the healthy extrovert kind." Everyone was encouraged to develop an extroverted personality and move away from their true selves. Introverts such as Charles Schwab, Bill Gates, Rosa Parks and Steve Wozniak, defied the odds of the Harvard Business School, The leaders of effective CEO’s, thought leaders and visionaries are filled with introverts. 

    Related Article: The Power of Habit: Why we do what we do in life and business

    So assuming again the dentist within a dental practice is most likely an introvert, we must applaud them and allow them the individual space and quiet to be innovative and creative. Other staff may or may not be introverts. Not only should the balance between personalities be there, but an understanding and respect for the attributes that the introverts possess. It has been said by Adam Grant, a professor at the Wharton School of Management, that "extroverted leaders enhance group performance when employees are passive, but introverted leaders are more effective with proactive employees." It is clear this could describe a dental practice surrounded by proactive employees.  These introverted leaders, such as dentists, have an inclination to listen to others and lack interest in dominating social situations.

    A recent reader comment in response to the article Are you annoying your patients touched on the importance of listening, and said it best: "Be interested, not interesting."

     

    It is clear now that carefully assembling individuals for the team of the dental practice, with consideration to the strengths of introversion and extroversion, will make a positive impact. The probability for the practice to work in a cohesive manner, while being profitable, is excellent. Susan Cain supports the extrovert personality, while allowing the introverts to be recognized as leaders.  She applauds their time spent in thought. The question she asks of us is how do you react to environmental stimulation? Putting yourself in the zone of stimulation that is best for you, allows your true self to emerge. Understanding the differences in introversion or extroversion stimulation allows balance in our work and personal lives. Extroverts may be seeing “What is”, while introverts are asking “What if."

    This book, written by an introvert, suggests utilizing this publication to improve your relationships with others. At its core, it stresses you are entitled to be yourself. Cain states that “if you are not an introvert yourself, you are surely raising, managing, married to or coupled with one”. I recommend this book as another exploration of aspects of relationships. It most likely could be a great addition to discussion in a dental staff meeting.

    Linda Steeves has 30 years of experience, knowledge and expertise as a dental hygienist, facilitator and consultant. She graduated from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin with a degree in Dental Hygiene and Biology, and has participated in extensive post graduate clinical and practice management education.

    Linda’s passion and commitment for dentistry spans clinical dentistry, public health, and practice and business management. Linda has a proven track record of effectively instilling this passion in others. This contributes to her success in establishing and implementing successful periodontal protocols and therapies, and merging her talents in clinical dentistry and the behavioral sciences.