Skip navigation

Product Spotlight

3M™ ESPE™ MDI Mini Dental Implants are minimally invasive and immediately stabilize loose dentures, often without a flap and frequently using an existing denture. Learn more

Advertisement

The name more dentists trust for all their anterior and posterior needs. Learn more about the composite that has been trusted in more than 400 million restorations. Read more

Advertisement

Combine the portable power of the new Pentamix™ Lite Automatic Mixing Unit with the speed of Imprint™ 4 VPS Impression Material to get the perfect mix of precision and accuracy.Click to learn more.

Advertisement

3M™ ESPE™ RelyX™ Luting Plus Cement is the first RMGI cement with a tack light cure option, reducing cleanup from minutes to just seconds. Light cure excess cement for about five seconds per surface to reach a gel state—then easily clean away large sections. Read more.

...

Read the Digital Edition

Browse Our Digital Magazine Gallery and Read Previous Editions!

 

ADA updates dental X-Ray recommendations

dentalproductsreport.com
2012-12
Wed, 2012-12-05 10:45 | Submitted press release

In an effort to decrease radiation exposure to patients, the American Dental Association’s (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs collaborated with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to update the ADA’s recommendations for dental X-ray examinations. The recommendations were released recently.

The ADA’s “Dental Radiograph Examinations: Recommendations for Patient Selection and Limiting Radiation Exposure” are intended to be used in conjunction with dentists’ professional judgment to determine whether and when dental X-rays are needed. Dental X-rays help dentists evaluate and diagnose oral diseases and conditions, but the ADA recommends that dentists weigh the benefits of taking dental X-rays against the possible risk of exposing patients to the radiation from X-rays, the effects of which can accumulate from multiple sources over time.

“As doctors of oral health, dentists are in the best position to make decisions on whether to prescribe dental X-rays after an oral examination and with consideration of the patient’s health history. Prescribing dental X-rays should be an individualized process,” said ADA President Robert A. Faiella, D.M.D., M.M.Sc. Since 1989, the ADA has recommended the ALARA principle in relation to dental X-rays—that radiation exposure to patients is “as low as reasonably achievable.”  

Changes to the recommendations include:

  • Updates to patient shielding recommendations
  • Addition of a new section on limiting radiation exposure during radiographic examinations
  • Including new topics such as receptor selection, handheld X-ray units, technique charts and radiation risk communication  

The ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs (CSA) consulted with dental radiology experts about a year ago to update the recommendations. The CSA then sent the recommendations for peer review and for review by non-dental organizations such as the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.  The recommendations are intended to serve as a resource for dentists and are not intended to be standards of care, requirements or regulations.